Tagged: identifying finds

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The History Of Russian Steel Helmets from 1916-1945, By Ivan Karabanov (Diggers Library+)

Greetings, fellow diggers, and collectors! I continue my topic of “A diggers/collectors library”, in which I introduce you to all the books and works from my personal library, which can be useful for any digger or collector in order to expand the horizons and gain new knowledge. For all the WW2/war relics diggers, it will be interesting to know the history of the Russian steel helmet, because as it turned...

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Homemade Grenade – A Dangerous Find!

On the one hand – a usual story, but on the other – no! This all began when some fellow detectorists went detecting in a field next to the old tavern, the field was repeatedly plowed by a tractor. They searched, dug and found, as they say, such a miracle: An ordinary cylinder of non-ferrous metal – it would see, what could it be? On closer inspection, it turned out that...

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Thracian Helmets Are Works Of Art! (Finds, Photos+)

Have you heard a story about two guys from Macedonia who dug up an incomprehensible ancient jug and sold it to a tourist from Germany for a penny? The jug turned out to be an old helmet and the tourist from Germany became a millionaire in one day. The morality is simple – you need to know your finds! And be able to determine them. But we will not only...

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Mysterious Ring With The Head Of The Devil (Identifying Finds+)

From time to time, a usual detectorist stumbles across a very unusual artifact. And sometimes the hypotheses of the origin and dating of these objects excite the minds of fellow detectorists so much that you simply marvel at it. And this time this exact thing happened… In the spring of 2016, there was a rumor among the treasure hunters of the Ryazan region that a unique mystical ancient ring was...

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How An Iron Cross Suddenly Became A Knight’s Cross (Just How Important It Is To Clean And Identify A Find Before Selling It)

Recently, at one famous Russian WW2 forum, there were auctions as always, on the one hand, seemingly quite ordinary – well, a ground dug Iron Cross, and even in the corresponding condition, but on the other hand – a very instructive example of why it is important to clean and identify the finds before selling them. And all would be well, but when the seller decided to find out what...

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Ear Cleaning Pendant, A Wonderful Relic! (Identifying Finds, Photos, Be Careful!+)

First, a non-trivial question: how do you clean your ears? Cotton swabs, most likely, and you probably never in your life realized that your ears can be cleaned with something else. But there is one nuance! It turns out in the old days our ancestors used a special object, which is called “ear cleaning pendant”. It’s hard to say when this subject first appeared, probably when one of the Hominidae...

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Finding Horse Decorations! (Identifying Finds, Photos +)

“Buttons from Gulliver’s pants” – this is the name that unexperienced detectorists sometimes call these finds, but of course they are wrong. Before you on this picture you can see a brass decoration buckle from a horse harness, or as we diggers like to call them, “horse buckles”. Such decorations were an invariable attribute from every farmer in the distant and not very distant past, and these days it is a...

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Wehrmacht WW2 Belt Buckles (Description, Variants, Identifying Finds +)

I will continue the subject of the “identifying finds from the Wehrmacht”. In the previous part we wrote about the mess kits of the Wehrmacht during the Second World War, about what types there was and how to determine them here: Wehrmacht Kochgeschirr. If you have not seen or read that article yet- I recommend it. Now I would like to tell more about the belt buckle of the Wehrmacht, and...

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Russian Square Coins Of Catherine I (Identifying Finds +)

Maybe you thought that the coins were always round? No, there are coins from different countries of all sorts and different shapes. Take, for example, the clip coins of the Swedish Empire – large squares and rectangles of copper, which can sometimes be found with a metal detector, but something that far from everybody knew: there were also Russian square coins! It turns out that in the Russian Empire, square...

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German Wehrmacht Mess Kits “Kochgeschirr” (Identifying Finds, Photos+)

A standard German mess kit, or “Kochgeschirr” as the Germans call it, consisted of two halves; the bottom or the “mess kit”, closed with a lid on top, which could be used as a pan. They were originally made of aluminium. The height of the Kochgeschirr is approximately 14 cm and it can hold about 1.7 liters. It is shaped kind of like a kidney when viewed from above. The...