Tagged: WW2

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20 Photos Of WW2 Finds That Every Detectorist Wish They Would Find (Amazing Finds, Photos+)

The season has now begun, and maybe it is time to give you diggers some motivation. Yes, now it is time to stand up from your couch, because while you sit here — someone else are digging your finds! But, there is a category of detectorists who don’t dig WW2 for different reasons, so with these photos we give greetings to those who can’t dig WW2, but would give everything...

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German WW2 Dog Tags (Identifying Finds, Photos+)

On the photo above you can see four tags from the 118th stationary artillery battalion found in a bundle. These are so-called “unused”. These tokens were not given out. Today i am going to tell you about dog tags. In the German terminology this object is titled Erkennungsmarke. Any self-respecting WW2 digger has eventually found a German badge, and sometimes more than one. In the memory of many of us, this...

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German helmets (Identifying Finds, Photos+)

One of the best ww2 finds is unquestionably the German helmet. Of course, depending on the decals and its condition. The sample in the photo above is indisputable from the category of amazing ones only because of the SS decal on the right side. Expert on this subject can argue long about the inexhaustible number of variants, decals, etc., taking up another heap and samples during the First World War. However, in...

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Improvised WW2 Mortar Hand Grenades (Identifying Finds, Photos+)

At Leningrad, and in many other parts of the North-West direction of the former Soviet-German front on the battlefield, a lot of different hand grenades can be found, which were made from the shells of ammunition for 50 mm Soviet mortars. It seems like the Red army forces in the besieged Leningrad were forced to use this kind of innovations, due to lack of hand grenades in the units defending the...

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German “Feldflasche 1931” (Identifying Finds, Photos+)

When detecting WW2 artifacts, one of the most frequent findings beside bullets can be German field flasks. And now we will discuss the most common German canteens that you will find from World War II. Of the many canteens which can occur when detecting a ww2 battlefield is the early-war model. This model, the 1931 German “Feldflasche 1931”, was used in all parts of the war, from the beginning to the end in May...

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German WW2 “Essbesteck” (Identifying finds)

The dream of every novice detectorist who looks for ww2 relics is to find a German folding “fork & spoon”. This item is, as the name says, a fork and a spoon, riveted together. It is quite compact, and therefore good for carrying in your pocket. It is very comfortable to use. I often use it myself when out on a trip. The Germans produced them in three metals –...

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Old man finds Willys jeep on the beach! (Funny)

  Picture this: you come to the beach with your detector and start digging, hoping to find a ring or some jewelry, but suddenly something happens and you get a strong signal. You start digging, but the signal still does not disappear, it is deeper and deeper. And suddenly …. You notice the hood of a car. This is exactly what happened in this video. Of course it is a joke,...

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Engraving on bayonets of the Wehrmacht / SS (don’t get fooled! + Photos)

Periodically i come across various people who try to innocently ask in social networks and forums whether this is a real engraving on the bayonet and how much it is worth? It is clear that we are dealing with a scammer who tries to possibly find a buyer, because a lot of diggers and collectors wants to take home a little souvenir or an object that would have had to do with the different...

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Walther in amazing condition found in the woods! (+photos)

I have found a lot of interesting relics in the woods. I have found some guns, but only in a barley recognizable condition! I remember the Luger found. Basically a piece of rust and nothing more.Maybe im just digging in the wrong dirt? Who knows. But some of the other peoples finds are just amazing, an a joy to watch! One lucky detectorist once found two guns during two trips, and both...

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German “Messerschmitt” raised from a fjord in Norway

On march 24th 1943, a German pilot named Günther Seraphim of the JG 5, suddenly experienced engine failure on his Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-2 “Yellow 3”. The circumstances forced him to make an emergency landing in the water near the Norwegian coast, near the town Rørvik. There, he was rescued from the water by a Norwegian named Olette Blikø and her 16-year-old son, Birger. The plane crashed into the water with its nose...